The Women’s Football BOOM!

In recent years gender equality in sports has made impressive strides, advancing societal expectations to a point beyond “football is for young men,” and “artful dance is for young women.”

And while women’s soccer (football) is no where near as popular on the global stage as the men’s game, the popularity curve is still trending upwards, pointing to the continual ascent of the women’s game. The media, and overall population, advances an imbalance in coverage and attention, but this hasn’t slowed down the determination of the sports governing bodies or executive leadership.

There are stars in women’s football, stars that will push forward, advance the game and release it back to another wave of even brighter more talented stars on the horizon we are yet to be introduced to.

Progress in equality issues comes in big steps and small. The 2015 Women’s World Cup saw the largest television audiences ever in the US for a soccer game – men’s or women’s – with over 25.4 million viewers tuning in to see US beat Japan 5-2.

That’s a big step.

But even the small steps matter – like inclusion.

EA Sports, in the 2016 version of their FIFA soccer game, for the first time included the option to play with women’s national teams. A seemingly small step, but with huge ramifications and international recognition as players become more identified and celebrated by the casual fan.

Women’s soccer is in it’s growth cycle, garnering attention of broadcast partners, highlighting stars, and developing competitive leagues around the globe. After the Brits finished third at the 2015 World Cup, attendance numbers for games of the women’s super league has risen by 26%.

There was a time not to long ago when people scoffed at the idea of the MLS in America, now some 24 years later it continues to grow in reach and credibility. That time is coming for women’s soccer, as they continue to develop a passionate fan base ready to travel to the next prime soccer destination.

It all starts with learning the main players, and being exposed to the great play on the pitch:

”The
The Women’s Football BOOM! by Clubline Football.

About Brian Clapp

Brian Clapp has worked in the sports media for over 14 years as a writer, editor, producer & news director. After beginning his career in Atlanta at CNN/Sports Illustrated, he switched coasts to Seattle to work at Fox Sports Northwest. In 2010, Brian began pursuing a new found passion on the digital media side, launching a successful website and then taking on the role of Director of Content for WorkinSports.com & WorkinEntertainment.com.

Recently, Brian has become addicted to Google+ and LinkedIn so add him to your circles and make him a contact. No seriously, do it.

And if you want to know where our privacy policy is before you submit your comments below, it's right here.

Comments

  1. Thank you Thank you

Speak Your Mind

*

fb_ol_standout